If you are looking for quality estate planning documents that are affordable and easy to understand, we can help. We specialize in Revocable Living Trusts.




Get started by watching our Estate Planning 101 Video. You'll learn the basics of Estate Planning and the major difference between a Will and a Trust. And don't worry, it's only 2 minutes and 44 seconds long.

Creating a Trust (Trust Package $495)

Our Trust Package is a great option if you: own/mortgage a home or other real estate (or plan to in the future); you have kids and/or you have assets (including life insurance); and you want to avoid probate.

What is a Revocable Living Trust?
A Revocable Living Trust (Trust) is a legal document or “Living Entity” that allows an individual or couple to transfer ownership of real property and/or assets (such as a home, real estate, bank accounts, certificates of deposit, securities, life insurance, stocks, bonds, etc.) from personal ownership into the legal ownership of the Trust. A Revocable Living Trust is just what the name implies, a document that is created during an individual or a couple’s life, but that can be changed or terminated at any time. A Trust allows the trustors/grantors (the individual or couple setting up the Trust) to decide who will receive their assets, how much they will receive, and when they receive it. A Trust allows the trustors/grantors to choose their successor trustees, who their beneficiaries are and appoint guardians for any minor children.

If a Revocable Living Trust is set up correctly and all of the property and assets are properly transferred to the Trust, it will provide the following benefits: Avoid probate entirely; distribute property and assets to the beneficiaries almost immediately; ensure any minor or disabled children are cared for; handle financial affairs if someone becomes incompetent; and save money in federal estate tax and capital gains taxes.

Unfortunately, about half of all people who have living Trusts never complete the funding process, which practically negates the advantages of setting up a Trust. “Funding” is another way of saying “Transferring” assets to the Trust. Our documents include all the information and paperwork you will need to complete this process.
What will happen to my assets if I die with a Trust?
One huge advantage of a Revocable Living Trust is the control that the trustors/ grantors have on when, where and how the assets are to be distributed. For example: If John and Jane Doe do not want their beneficiaries receiving an outright distribution of the assets until they reach the age of 25, this could be stipulated in a Trust. This does not mean that the beneficiaries cannot use the money until they are 25, it simply means that the successor trustee(s) will be managing those assets until the beneficiaries reach the age of 25. Prior to reaching the age of 25, the assets may be used for health, education, maintenance and support.

In a Trust, the beneficiaries are the people and/or organizations to which you leave your assets. Most people have a pretty good idea of who their direct beneficiaries will be. Beneficiaries may be children, grandchildren, other family members, friends, charities, organizations, etc. Couples in second, or subsequent marriages may face more complicated decisions if there are children from a prior marriage.

THE PROCESS: With a Trust you select a successor trustee(s) to handle the business affairs and distribution of the estate after your death. The successor trustee could be one or more person(s) or entities, such as a bank or trust company. The successor trustee is usually a trusted friend or family member. A successor trustee locates the Trust after the trustors/ grantors death; files an inventory and appraisal of the property; pays any creditors, taxes, and fees; distributes the assets to the beneficiaries. Before selecting a successor trustee, the responsibilities need to be discussed with the individual or couple to see if they are willing and able to perform these duties. It is also a good idea to name an alternate successor trustee if, for any reason, the first choice cannot serve.
What will happen to my home (Real Property) if I die with a Trust?
First and foremost you must understand that you have to properly transfer your home (Real Property) into your Trust while you are alive. If you fail to transfer your property into the Trust, it will be subject to probate.

To transfer property into your Trust you must record a deed at the county recorders office. We can easily prepare this deed for you, or you can contact a title company and pay to have the title transferred.

If your real property has been correctly transferred into your Trust, your successor trustee will be able sell the property and avoid probate entirely.

After your death your successor trustee will take the Trust Agreement, proper photo identification, and a death certificate(s) into the title company who they are working with to sell the home. The title company will then transfer the title of the property into the successor trustee's name as follows: "Jack Doe, as Trustee of the Jane and John Doe Family Trust". The successor trustee can then sell the property (avoiding probate completely) and distribute the proceeds according to the guidelines in the Trust.
Who will act as Guardian for my minor children if I have a Trust?
An actual Trust does not provide for setting-up guardianship for minor children. However, we know this is a major step in setting-up a thorough estate plan and have included the proper documents you will need in the Trust Package we offer.

In our "Pour-Over" Will that we include in our Trust Package, you can select guardians for minor children. However, the individual or couple that you select cannot serve as legal guardian or conservator until approved by the court. (Any type of guardianship must be approved by the court.) Parents with children under the age of eighteen (18) have two estate planning concerns. The first is providing for the custody of their children should both of them die at the same time. The second concern is nominating a conservator (money manager) to supervise and manage any assets the child would inherit. The same person may fulfill both roles, or one individual may be named as the children's guardian and another as the money manager. It is always a good idea to name alternate guardians and conservators for minor children in case the first choice is unable to serve.

Providing care and support for children with a disability is also very important. Parents must choose a personal guardian to be responsible for the disabled child. Additionally, the parents must choose a financial manager to supervise any money or property they leave for the care of the disabled child for as long as the child lives.
Who will make medical decisions for me if I have a Trust and I become incapacitated?

A Trust doesn't cover this. However, our Trust Package includes a Medical Power of Attorney and Living Will that allows you to specify your wishes and who will carry them out for you if you become incapacitated.

Who will make financial decisions for me if I have a Trust and I become incapacitated?

Our Trust Package allows your successor trustees to make financial decisions for you if you are incapacitated regarding assets that are owned by the Trust. We also include a financial power of attorney that will allow your designated Agent to make financial decisions for you if you are incapacitated reagarding assets that are not owned by the Trust. (Note: two doctors must certify in writing that you are incapacitated.)

Please note: Your Durable Power of Attorney ends when you die.

How does my Personal Business work with a Trust?
Business interests should be transferred to the Trust by completing a transfer agreement called an Assignment. We provide this with our Trust Package.
Do Revocable Living Trusts offer liability protection?
Revocable Living Trusts do NOT protect property and assets from personal liabilities and nursing home costs. Since the individual or couple who formed it can change the Trust at any time, the income and assets in the Trust are considered available to cover nursing home costs under current Medicaid rules.

What's Included in my Trust Package?

Revocable Living Trust

A Revocable Living Trust is a legal document or "Living Entity" that allows you to transfer ownership of real property and/or assets (such as a home, real estate, bank accounts, certificates of deposit, securities, life insurance, stocks, bonds, etc.) from your personal ownership into the legal ownership of the Trust. A Living Trust is just what the name implies, a document that is created during your life, but that can be changed or terminated at any time. A Trust allows you to decide who will receive your assets, how much they will receive, and when they receive it. A Trust allows you to choose your successor trustees, who your beneficiaries are and appoint guardians for any minor children.

If a Trust is set up correctly and all of the property and assets are properly transferred to the trust it will provide the following benefits: Avoid probate entirely; distribute property and assets to the beneficiaries almost immediately; ensure any minor or disabled children are cared for; handle financial affairs if you become incompetent; keep everything private and out of the public eye; and save money in federal estate tax and capital gains taxes.

Declaration of Trust

Under certain, very limited circumstances, the Declaration could possibly be helpful after your death if you neglected to transfer a valuable asset to your Trust; it merely confirms that you intended to include all of your assets within your Trust. The Declaration is not a substitute for the requirement that you must transfer ("title") your assets into the name of your Trust in order to avoid a potential probate of those non-Trust assets.

Assignment of Personal Property and Business Interests

The Assignment acts as the method of transferring all of your personal property assets (generally they do not have a title or an ownership document) and Business Interests to your Trust (thereby avoiding the necessity or possibility of having to probate such assets).

We also include a form where you can designate the distribution of specific items of personal property (e.g., the 1970 Plymouth Barracuda goes to my nephew Jack, my wedding ring goes to my daughter Alice, etc.). This form can be edited, crossed out, added to, etc as your desires and personal belongings change over time. Personal items generally should not be named in the trust.

Funding Documents - Schedule "A"

Schedule "A" is an inventory of your "Assets" and set of instruction letters that indicates how to transfer property and assets to the trust. Once the property and assets have been properly transferred to the trust, verification and confirmation of the transfers should be kept in Schedule A. When both of the trustors have passed away, the successor trustees will use Schedule A to quickly locate assets and property. It is very important to keep Schedule A current and up to date.

This is the MOST IMPORTANT part of a Trust. A Trust must be properly funded with assets in order to operate properly. If these items are not properly transferred into the Trust, they may be subject to probate!

Certification of Trust

The Certification sets forth the existence of your Trust and your unlimited right as Trustee to deal with any account or asset held in the Trust. The Certification acts as a short version of the Trust Agreement and gives any third party all the information required from the Trust without getting into the dispositive provisions, which are (and should remain) confidential.

Last Will and Testament "Pour-Over Will"

This Will is commonly referred to as a "Pour-Over" Will. Under the terms of the Will, any assets held by you which have not previously been transferred into your Trust will be added to the Trust at the time of your death (but may be subject to probate in order to do so). The purpose of this is to make sure all of your assets (whether in the Trust or not) are distributed according to the distribution plan set forth in the Trust. The Will also names guardianship of minor children.

Durable Power of Attorney for Management of Property and Personal Affairs

The Durable Power of Attorney is a "general power of attorney". This document is primarily intended to give your named agent the power to deal with any trust or non-trust assets in the event of your incapacity. This document gives your agent broad powers to dispose of, sell, convey and encumber your real and personal property.

Health Care Power of Attorney and Living Will

The Health Care Power gives your named Agent the power to make medical decisions, sign consents and/or releases with hospitals and/or doctors if you are incapacitated. It also includes your "Living Will" for end-of-life decisions.

The appointed health care agent may be any competent person who is at least eighteen (18) years old and not providing paid health care to you. This person is usually a trusted family member or friend.
Burial and Final Instructions

The last instructions give you the ability to specify how you wish your remains to be dealt with (e.g., cremation or burial); to provide information of any prior arrangements and to designate the persons to carry-out your wishes.

Instructions for Successor Trustee, Powers of Attorney and Guardian (if applicable)

These instructions give direction to your Successor Trustee, Powers of Attorney and Guardian in the event of your incapacitation or death.

If you own (or mortgage) any property, you will also need to purchase a deed to transfer real property ($100 per deed)

The deed (typically a Quit-Claim Deed or a Warranty Deed) is used to transfer the title (Ownership) of your real property to the Trust. This is done by recording the deed at the county recorder's office where the property is located. This must be done properly in order to avoid probate.

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What decisions do I need to make before I get started?


There are five main decisions you need to make to get things started on your Estate Plan. Watch our 1 minute video above to learn these important decisions and then read below for more details.

1- Who will manage your money when you die?

You will need to name a successor trustee that will handle the business affairs and distribution of the estate after you pass away. This can be one or more people and is usually a trusted family member or friend.

Who should I choose?

This is usually a trusted family member or friend. You could choose your parents, adult children (over the age of 18), a sibling, close friend or even a bank. There are also Trust companies that you can hire to act as your money manager.

What are my options and how many people can I choose?

You have several options when selecting a successor trustee.

1: A single successor trustee (no back-up is named).

2: A single successor trustee with only one named alternate successor trustee.

3: A single successor trustee, then an alternate and then another back-up (each successor trustee is named and serves in succession).

4: A single successor trustee with two alternate co-trustees if the first cannot act.

5: Two successor co-trustees; if one co-trustee fails, the other continues to act alone (no alternate successor trustee is named).

6: Two successor co-trustees; if either co-trustee fails, the other continues to act alone. If both co-trustees fail, an alternate trustee is named.

7: Three successor co-trustees acting jointly; if one co-trustee fails, the other two act jointly, if two fail, the survivor acts alone:

What will my Successor Trustee do?

A successor trustee locates the estate planning documents after you pass away; files an inventory and appraisal of the property; pays any creditors, taxes, and fees; distributes the assets to the beneficiaries. Before selecting a successor trustee, the responsibilities should be discussed with the individual or couple to see if they are willing and able to perform these duties. It is also a good idea to name at least one alternate successor trustee if, for any reason, the first choice cannot serve.

2- Where does your money go?

In a Trust, the beneficiaries are the people and/or organizations you leave your assets to.

What are my options and how many people can I choose?
Most people have a pretty good idea of who their direct beneficiaries will be. Beneficiaries may be children, grandchildren, other family members, friends, charities, organizations, etc. In our questionnaire, you will be able to select if you want your assets to be distributed equally or based on a certain percentage. You can also specify if you would like your assets distributed to your children at certain ages etc.

3- Who takes care of your children?

If you have children under the age of eighteen (18), you need to decide who will get custody of your minor children if something happened to you (and your spouse if applicable).

You can choose an individual or a couple. If you choose a couple (e.g. a brother and a sister-in-law), and one of them dies (e.g. brother), the remaining spouse (e.g. sister-in-law) will act alone. If that is not what you want, consider choosing just the brother.

It is always a good idea to name an alternate guardian(s) for minor children in case the first choice is unable to.

If you are divorced and share custody with your child's biological parent, the biological parent will generally get full custody (even if your documents state otherwise).

PLEASE NOTE: Any guardian that you select cannot serve until appointed by the court.

PLEASE NOTE: the successor trustee that you choose will be in charge of the finances for your minor children.

What are my options and how many people can I choose?
You have several options when selecting a guardian(s) for your minor children:

OPTION 1: Only one guardian (no back-up is named).

OPTION 2: A primary guardian with only one named successor guardian.

OPTION 3: One primary guardian with a named successor guardian and then a third named successor guardian.

OPTION 4: A primary guardian with two successor co-guardians if the primary guardian stops acting.

OPTION 5: Two co-guardians only; the survivor acts alone (no successor is named).

OPTION 6: Two co-guardians; the survivor acts alone and a successor guardian is named in case both of the co-guardians stop acting.

OPTION 7: A list of the guardians in column format.

4- Who makes medical decisions for you if you are incapacitated?

A medical power of attorney is a document that allows someone else to make medical decisions for you if you become incapacitated. This person can be any competent person who is at least 18 years old and not providing paid health care to you. If you are married, this person is usually your spouse first, then a trusted family member or friend as the alternate. The Health Care Directive becomes effective when you are unable to communicate due to any illness or injury.

What are my options and how many people can I choose?
If you are married, your spouse will act as the primary agent that will make medical decisions for you if you are unable to. Below are your options if your spouse was not there to make medical decisions:

OPTION 1: A single successor agent (no back-up is named).

OPTION 2: A single successor agent with only one named alternate agent.

OPTION 3: A single successor agent, then an alternate and then another back-up (each successor agent is named and serves in succession).

OPTION 4: A single successor agent with two alternate co-agents if the first cannot act.

OPTION 5: Two successor co-agents; if one co-agent fails, the other continues to act alone (no alternate successor agent is named).

OPTION 6: Two successor co-agents; if either co-agent fails, the other continues to act alone. If both co-agents fail, an alternate agent is named.

OPTION 7: Three successor co-agents acting jointly; if one co-agent fails, the other two act jointly, if two fail, the survivor acts alone:

5- Who makes financial decisions for you if you are incapacitated?

A durable power of attorney is a document that allows someone else to make legal or financial decisions for you if you become incapacitated. The appointed agent is called the attorney-in-fact (no, it doesn't have to be an actual attorney) and they can be any competent person who is at least 18 years old. If you are married, this person is usually your spouse first, then a trusted family member or friend as the alternate. The durable power of attorney becomes effective when two unrelated physicians have certified in writing that you are unable to manage your own legal or financial affairs. PLEASE NOTE: The Durable Power of Attorney doesn't work after you die.

What are my options and how many people can I choose?
If you are married, your spouse will act as the primary agent that will make financial decisions for you if you are incapacitated. Below are your options if your spouse was not there to make financial decisions:

OPTION 1: A single successor agent (no back-up is named).

OPTION 2: A single successor agent with only one named alternate agent.

OPTION 3: A single successor agent, then an alternate and then another back-up (each successor agent is named and serves in succession).

OPTION 4: A single successor agent with two alternate co-agents if the first cannot act.

OPTION 5: Two successor co-agents; if one co-agent fails, the other continues to act alone (no alternate successor agent is named).

OPTION 6: Two successor co-agents; if either co-agent fails, the other continues to act alone. If both co-agents fail, an alternate agent is named.

OPTION 7: Three successor co-agents acting jointly; if one co-agent fails, the other two act jointly, if two fail, the survivor acts alone:

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What happens after I complete the online questionnaire?


Our Process:

We want to reinvent the typical estate planning experience. Many attorneys and other legal planning companies just prepare your docs and send you on your way. We are committed to providing the best documents at an affordable price and helping you through the entire process...the creation of your documents is just the beginning.

1 - After we receive your completed questionnaire, we will prepare your documents.

2 - We will email you the highlights so you can check for accuracy and confirm the decisions that you have made.

3 - Give us the "thumbs-up" and we will print, bind and ship a hard copy of your fancy new Estate Plan.

4 - Now it is time to learn how to make your documents work properly, this is also called "Funding your Trust". And don't worry...you can always come back to this section when you need help.

Signing and Notarizing your documents

Once you receive your completed Estate Plan you need to make it legal. Take your documents to a local notary...any bank, credit union, property and casualty insurance agent or UPS store will have one. Please note that several documents must be signed in front of a notary AND two witnesses that are over the age of 18. Please note that these witnesses cannot be related to you.

Funding your Trust:

Funding your Trust (transferring your assets into the name of your Trust) is the MOST IMPORTANT PART of having a Trust. Your Trust must be funded with assets in order for it to operate properly. Schedule A (included in your Trust documents) is used to help you create an inventory of assets to be included in your Trust. Listing your assets in Schedule A is not enough! In order to avoid probate, you must contact each financial institution individually and follow the instructions we provide to move your assets into the name of your Trust. Each type of asset requires a different process so please follow the instructions carefully.

What assets need to go into my Trust?
(additional details for each asset provided in the following sections)
1 - Real Estate
2 - Bank or Credit Union Accounts
3 - Life Insurance
4 - Brokerage Accounts
5 - Retirement Accounts
6 - Business Interests or Partnerships
What do I do with assets I already own?
All of the assets you currently own need to be transferred into the name of the Trust, or the Trust needs to be listed as the beneficiary. (additional details for each asset provided in the following sections)

In the "Schedule A" section of your binder, we have provided sample letters for you to use to transfer your assets. Go to this section of your binder and follow the instructions carefully to make sure each asset is properly transferred or the Trust is named as the beneficiary. Many companies/banks may require you to use their own forms.

What do I do when I purchase a new asset?
Once you have created your Trust, all newly acquired assets need to be either owned by the Trust or the Trust needs to be named as the beneficiary. (additional details provided in the following sections)
Does my personal property need to be put into the Trust?
Keep in mind when you acquire tangible, personal property (car, recreational vehicles, artwork, collectibles, etc.) they do not need to be purchased in the name of the Trust. The Assignment of Personal Property (included in your Trust documents) accounts for this type of property.
REMEMBER ANY ASSETS LEFT OUT OF THE TRUST MAY BE SUBJECT TO PROBATE!

Real Estate

Transferring property into the name of your Trust is one of the most, no – it is THE most important step in funding your Trust. If it is not recorded correctly, your property may be subject to probate – and let’s be honest - that is what we are trying to avoid!

Transferring existing property into the Trust:

A deed must be prepared to transfer the ownership of your property into your Trust. We can prepare your deed for $100 per deed, or you can contact a local title company to do it for you. Prices vary across the country, but deed preparation typically ranges from $50-$750. Our deeds are accepted in every state and we include instructions indicating your county recording fees and recording/mailing instructions. PLEASE NOTE: It is very important that a deed is properly recorded or it will be subject to probate!

You have a title to your property (the title states ownership) and you (may) have a mortgage on your property (the mortgage is your loan). They are completely separate from each other. When transferring existing property or purchasing a new property, only the title needs to be in the name of the Trust. It should look like this:

HUSBAND NAME and WIFE NAME, as co-Trustees of TRUST NAME, dated TRUST DATE (your Trust date is the day that your Trust was signed and notarized)

Purchasing new real estate:

You have a title to your property (the title states ownership) and you (may) have a mortgage on your property (the mortgage is your loan). They are completely separate from each other. When purchasing a new property, only the title needs to be in the name of the Trust. It should look like this:

HUSBAND NAME and WIFE NAME, as co-Trustees of TRUST NAME

Refinancing property:

Depending on your mortgage lender, you may be able to do this the "really easy" way or the "somewhat easy" way.

• REALLY EASY – Some lenders simply need proof of your Trust to complete your refinance. If that is the case, the Certification of Trust (found in your binder) has everything they need. Send in a copy and you are good to go.

• SOMEWHAT EASY – Some lenders require you to transfer the title of your property back into your individual name(s) PRIOR to refinancing your home (because some mortgage companies are particular and like to loan money to individuals, NOT Trusts.) Once the refinance is complete, you then need to transfer the title back into the Trust. Make it easy and give us a call. We will prepare the deeds to make the transfer “out of” and “back into” the Trust for a small fee.

Timeshare property:

You will need to contact your timeshare property directly and inquire about their requirements. We do not currently handle the transfer of timeshare properties. Your timeshare property will most likely direct you to a title company that they use to assist you.

Bank Or Credit Union Accounts (Checking, Savings, etc.)

You have two options when transferring a bank account or credit union account into your Trust:

Option One:

Contact your bank or credit union and ask for a “Change of Beneficiary” form. Change the PRIMARY beneficiary to the Trust. You will not need CONTINGENT beneficiaries because the Trust has that under control. It should look like this:

Primary Beneficiary: TRUST NAME

Most financial institutions will ask for the following:

• Name of the Trust

• Date of the Trust (date you signed and notarized it)

• Trustee (that’s you and/or your spouse)

Some financial institutions ask for a Tax ID number. That is your social security number. If your financial institution asks for a copy of the Trust, you can send in the “Certification of Trust” document (included in your Trust documents) – it has everything they need.

Option Two:

Contact your bank or credit union and request a “Change of Ownership” form. Instruct them to make your Trust the OWNER of the account. It should look like this:

Owner: HUSBAND NAME and WIFE NAME, as co-Trustees of TRUST NAME

Most financial institutions will ask for the following:

• Name of the Trust

• Date of the Trust (date you signed and notarized it)

• Trustee (that’s you and/or your spouse)

Some financial institutions ask for a Tax ID number. That is your social security number. If your financial institution asks for a copy of the Trust, you can send in the “Certification of Trust” document (included in your Trust documents) – it has everything they need.

Life Insurance Policies

How do I transfer my Life Insurance policies into the Trust?

Contact your life insurance agent or life insurance company and ask for a “Change of Beneficiary” form. Change the PRIMARY beneficiary to the Trust. You will not need CONTINGENT beneficiaries because the Trust has that under control. It should look like this:

Primary Beneficiary: TRUST NAME

Most companies will ask for the following:

• Name of the Trust

• Date of the Trust (date you signed and notarized it)

• Trustee (that’s you and/or your spouse)

Some companies ask for a Tax ID number. That is your social security number. If your insurance company asks for a copy of the Trust, you can send in the “Certification of Trust” document (included in your Trust documents) – it has everything they need.

Brokerage Accounts

(Dividend Reinvestment Accounts, Stock Certificates, Securities etc.)

How do I transfer my Brokerage Accounts into the Trust?

Contact your broker or investment firm and request a “Change of Ownership” from. Instruct them to make your Trust the OWNER of the account. If you have actual stock certificates, request that the stock be re-issued in the name of your Trust. It should look like this:

Owner: HUSBAND NAME and WIFE NAME, as co-Trustees of TRUST NAME

Most firms will ask for the following:

• Name of the Trust

• Date of the Trust (date you signed and notarized it)

• Trustee (that’s you and/or your spouse)

Some firms ask for a Tax ID number. That is your social security number. If your investment firm asks for a copy of the Trust, you can send in the “Certification of Trust” document (included in your Trust documents) – it has everything they need.

Retirement Accounts

(Pensions, Annuities, IRA (Roth), 401K, 457, ESOPS, SEP, etc.)

How do I transfer my Retirement Accounts into the Trust?

Please consult your tax advisor before making any changes. Typically, you will contact these financial firms and ask for a “Change of Beneficiary” form. For tax purposes, it is important to keep your spouse as the PRIMARY beneficiary on these accounts. Change the CONTINGENT beneficiary to the Trust. It should look like this:

Contingent Beneficiary: TRUST NAME

Most firms will ask for the following:

• Name of the Trust

• Date of the Trust (date you signed and notarized it)

• Trustee (that’s you and/or your spouse)

Some firms ask for a Tax ID number. That is your social security number. If your investment firm asks for a copy of the Trust, you can send in the “Certification of Trust” document (included in your Trust documents) – it has everything they need.

Business Interests

(business interests, partnership interests, contracts, notes, receivables, etc.)

How do I transfer my Business Interests into the Trust?

Complete an Assignment transferring all interests from your name to the name of your Trust. Due to its importance, we strongly recommend contacting Easy Legal Planning for assistance with business interest transfers.

Keep all business assignments in the back of Schedule A in your binder.





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